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Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the president. when he said that he was the man who was responsible for three surpluses under bill clinton, let me tell you, bill clinton had three different programs to reduce the budget deficit and bring about that. so it was a presidential decision. it's not the decision of the budget director. having said that he is widely recognized as being outstanding budget director. he is not widely recognized for understanding the world of finance or knowing the people in the world of finance but let's hope we don't have another financial crisis, although with the kind of deficits we are running, we are vulnerable to a financial crisis. >> but he appears to be a person you can rely on. >> yes, without question. he knows the budget, as people say, inside and out. he's a very solid guy. his word is taken at its face value, and he knows how to deal on 1. new york university, executive vice president and coo. that means pryears, 2010 to 20 126789 he's been chief of staff for this year. i guess last year and this year, and that's about it. >> we have our own wikipedia here on the set. >> we all want to be
of where george w. bush was in 2005 but seven points behind bill clinton. >> ronald reagan had the same rating as bill clinton at 62% and richard nixon was down to 51% in 1973. both lyndon johnson and dwight eisenhower topped everyone here, they reached the low 70s. they were at 71% and 73% respentively. >> that's pretty impressive. >> those numbers would never exit tod exist today. >>> thousands of people are starting to descend this morning. >> never too early to get ready. this morning, though, we'll look past the oath of office to the next four years. the issues, the plans, the prospects. as joe johns reports, some of the most notorious scandals also happened in the second term. >> reporter: president obama has high hopes for the next four years. >> i intend to carry out the agenda that i campaigned on. >> reporter: if he wants to reach that goal, history says a second-term president has got to move fast. >> power does seep away from the presidency very quickly in the second term. >> second term presidents and their congresses have two different clocks and the president's clock is n
interrupt at any moment. >> i will. >> look, your president, bill clinton, had a great economy and then the monica lewinsky scandal and impeachment came along. and his agenda went off the tracks. your president, the opposition to the iraq war was growing. he won re-election but it kept growing and katrina came along and it undermined his second term. what lesson did you learn from a second term that could help this president? >> well, the president's problem was personal, not policy -- >> there are so many inappropriate things i could think to answer that question. >> but it's a completely different thing for that reason. but -- >> he got a budget. >> he got a balanced budget and the only world leader in world history to win a war without losing a single soldier, the war in kosovo which was a major war. >> i set him up for that. >> he had a very impressive second term but he had a huge personal problem that the republicans made a political problem. but i would actually counsel any president, especially this one, humility. you know, when a new hope is invested, there's someone s
, george bush raised it 7 times, bill clinton raised it 8 times. so, you know, both sides do it so it must be okay, and from the perspective of fair and balanced, it has to stop no matter who is president. we go through the same cycle, we raise the debt limit, spend more,en go out and borrow more, and raise the debt limit again and it looks like it's unstoppable, but this is the check and balance of how t govern our society. we can't afford the bills we have now to pay. someone has to say, no, spend what you have and let's move on. >> brenda: you know, it doesn't really mean anything. why not get rid of it. it's been used for political hay, both parties have made political hay out of it. >> that's right, every 18 months we're going through an economic crisis and here we have another one brewing regarding the debt ceiling. let's get rid of it. i'm all for smaller government, but this economy rig now, guys, still remains fragile and you can't have the american consumer having to worry about going through all the rigamarole in washington all over agn, and that hits consumer reading and we don
with an approval rating of 55 points ahead, but seven points behind bill clinton, who was up to 62% in 1997. with that kind of support, does he still need to reach out to the rest of the country? >> he absolutely does. he has four years of governing ahead of him and he has a legacy to build. these next four years are incredibly important for what barack obama, president obama is going to stand for in history. i agree with maria, it has to be about unity. tomorrow is a day for lofty rhetoric. not a day for details or policy specifics. it's a day to bring us together to make us all feel american and celebrate democracy. you know what i think he's going to try to be? memorable. very few memorable state of the inaugural addresses. i think he is going to shoot for that memory tomorrow. >> a lot of democrats in town and a lot of the parties today, tomorrow, will be democrats. what do you do if you're a republican this weekend? what is the right way to behave today, tomorrow and then going forward, do you think? >> watch it on tv and eat ice cream. >> eat bonbons on the couch. >> dump your thumb i
a decade ago to when bill clinton was president and the government did shut down. who got the blame for that? it was congressional republicans. and that's why it's interesting that congressional republicans this time around taken such a hard line saying we're ready to go and let the government default if we don't get more spending cuts. >> what do you think is the strategy there looking at history and not very distant history, shira? >> i think that's, frankly, all republican haves to bargain with at this point. they're bargaining and when the president was at the podium today he essentially said your move, congress. come up with the next idea. but generally, that's all they have. they have the majority in the house. and in that case, it's not a very controlled caucus. it's a very fractured caucus. democrats controlling the senate and the white house. they don't have a good bargaining position here again. all they can do is appeal to the base and american people they want more spending cuts. >> jimmy, congresswoman morris, a republican quoted on politico saying i think it's possible
's go back a few administrations for context. bill clinton started his second term, enjoyed the highest recent number of people who felt the country was in good shape on inauguration day. >> all right. let's get to gloria borger. i was writing down those numbers. john avlon and david gergen are also here. that's an interesting set of numbers. i would look at 49 in terms of approval, things like that, six, eight months ago as a big improvement. >> it is. and his personal likability is still over 61%. but what i'm looking at is the country's expectations. when president obama was first inaugurated, he became -- and a lot of his staffers will tell you this -- sort of a victim of the high expectations that the public had for him. now the expectations are kind of lower, so the folks in the administration are saying, well, if the expectations are lower, maybe we can overperform a little instead of underperforming like people thought we did last time around. so they're kind of looking for the glass half full part of this. equation. >> one of the things going on beneath numbers indicates a sort
, to be understood deeply, and to be not so very lonely. >> and former president bill clinton surprised everyone when he came out to salute "lincoln." in the end they laughed, they cried, and, of course, the party continues. >> good night. we're going home with jody foster. >> it was a good show. it was also a good night for ben affleck who seemed genuinely shocked at both his win for best director and the win for "argo" for best drama. we'll have to see if the momentum for "argo" carries over to the oscars in the best picture race. something audiences didn't see happened back stage in the press room after "django unchained" writer and director quinton terramtino. it has come under scrutiny for its liberal use of the n-word, and terrintino was candid in his response about why he used it so much. >> if somebody is out there saying it when it comes to the word [ bleep ], that the fact that i was using it in the movie more than it was used back in the antebellum south in 1858 in mississippi, then had he might have -- then feel free to make that case, but no one is actually making that case. >> now, ther
thing to vote against it when you're squandering a bill clinton surplus on tax cuts for those who don't need tax cuts pre-2008. it is another thing when you're trying to climb out of a recession. >> that's exactly right. there is a lot of misunderstanding about the debt ceiling. most americans think the debt ceiling is congress giving itself permission to spend more money. when they understand it is about do we default on our bills they say what? you're not going to pay your bills? that's what the debt ceiling is about. one of the things i advocated was the restoration of the gephardt rule that said when congress voted for a budget, let's say it voted for the iraq war that cost a trillion dollars, then at the moment that they voted for that program the debt ceiling would be adjusted up or down to reflect the budget they just voted for. that's what most americans would do. so this debt ceiling is all about hypocrisy. it is all about pretending that we have an option about paying our bills. by the way, a lot of the bills we have to pay are things i was adamantly opposed to. i didn't wan
to see in the progression of history when bill clinton became president, a generation had passed that world war ii group had moved and were no longer going to be presidents. it seems to me we are now past the vietnam stage wheith presidt obama. it is difficult for me. i think joe biden wants to be president and he'll run for president at this very moment, but i think it's a tough sell for both vice president biden and hillary clinton because you are going back a generation. part of this president's appeal has been to young people. >> it is. my experience in all of this is the same that once america moves forward a generation, it almost never moves back and that was a problem for the mccains and even the romneys of this world. however -- when you're the vp, you get one shot to extend. you are defined by the guy above you. so, you get to ride on the previous generation. >> he gets younger. >> he's the youngest guy in this town, too. >> benjamin button. >> i talked to a veteran democratic actrist strategist who has been involved and she told me within 48 hours she got a call from bo
she was very proud of her family. of course, her father, bill clinton, her mother, hillary clinton and how they have served and that it was actually her father in his presidency that he was able to sign the bill for mlk day, making that national day of service. so a lot of people very excited to meet the folks who have come out here. kate, we've got one other special treat for you. star jones in a totally different role than what we've seen before. it is so nice to see you. you're looking fabulous. tell us about the red and what that symbolizeds. >> when i go red, i really do go red. i admit this. you know february is the beginning of the national heart month. and go red for women. i'm the face of go red for women. the national volunteer fors american heart association and in that capacity, i was speaking here at the national day of service. one encouraging heart health for the individual and sharing my story of heart disease and survivorship and then two, getting people back involved in their community to advocate for their own health and for the health of their families. >> tell
with the federal response to hurricane katrina there was the iraq war. you also had, you know, bill clinton everybody remembers, what happened in his second term. what are the potential problems that lie ahead for this president? >> well, i think any president who wins a second term clearly wants to fet -- get a lot accomplished. they feel freed up to do the things they hope they wanted to do, they figure voters endorsed them and endorsed everything they said they were going to do. that is actually not the case. a lot of times voters decided they like the incumbent than the other guy, trusted him more than the other guy he was running against of the you have members from your own party, you're on your way out two years from now and four years from now, why do we have to stick our neck out for big things but we have to pay the price and we would like to stick around for a while. having said that, for all the problems bill clinton had in effect in his second term he pick up seats, his party did in the 1998 midterms. when you look at george w. bush and his presidency, republicans had been in c
about second term curses that have brought down richard nixon, hampered ronald reagan, bill clinton. people forget reagan was able to get tax reform, bill clinton was able to get a balanced budget. certainly a big opportunity for the president but fully aware in the white house, a lot of challenges ahead as well, jenna. >> certainly not challenges for a father. nice to see the first family, ed, and how much the girls have grown up over the last four years. what we're looking at for the president tomorrow besides the hair styles and what everybody is wearing at the inauguration is what is he going to say? what will be the address to the nation tomorrow? you mentioned some policy challenges ahead. what are you hearing about tomorrow's address and how that might set the table, if you will, for the years to come? >> true. what i'm hearing is the state of the union address next month is really where the president will go with a deeper dive on policy, whether it be gun control, immigration reform, the debt ceiling debate. tomorrow's broad scene. his senior advisor will talk about bringing
of the clinton bill, he stood up and said -- he told the story of the valentine's day massacre in 1929. and how it shocked the world when seven gangsters were gunned down in cold blood. it made the fog page -- the front page of every major paper in the nation and around the world. but in 1992, when a woman say to three month-old baby from execution by hiding that baby under the bed -- she was shot and killed along with her husband and teenage son. that story turned up on the second section buried in the back of the new york times. it was not front page news. it was barely news at all. i'll never forget what he said. he said, "i called that defining deviancy down." it wasn't even news. had it happened in 1929, it would've been astonishing. we can no longer to continue to define it deviancy down. we cannot wait any longer to take action. the time has come. as you know i delivered a set of recommendations to president obama on how we can better protect americans from gun violence i have been getting both credit and blame from that. i want to make it clear. the only power the vice president has is
was the point person for president clinton and passing the brady bill in the late part of november 93 and the assault weapon ban in the house in the spring of 94, those two those are very focused on criminal access. president clinton's legislation post-columbine did not pass. so the notion that everybody should rely on the energy and force of newton, i would caution not to do that. it's galvanized the country to have an honest conversation and look internally and had a serious conversation. but the assault weapon ban was done without a columbine would have been in virginia. i do believe just in the last four years on the loudspeakers of politics would have been there has made all of us a discussion that is sitting on the sideline to be focused to introduces legislation or package and decide what legislatively he's going to do by executive order. but we are at a tipping point to have a discussion that's been postponed, delayed. but my small flashing yellow light of caution is anything to laugh time we really had success, which goes back to 93 and 94, those are pretty columbine. his ent
't change the paths, but he can go forward and accomplish great things. just ask bill clinton. i have low testosterone. there, i said it. how did i know? well, i didn't really. see, i figured low testosterone would decrease my sex drive... but when i started losing energy and became moody... that's when i had an honest conversation with my doctor. we discussed all the symptoms... then he gave me some blood tests. showed it was low t. that's it. it was a number -- not just me. [ male announcer ] today, men with low t have androgel 1.62% (testosterone gel). the #1 prescribed topical testosterone replacement therapy, increases testosterone when used daily. women and children should avoid contact with application sites. discontinue androgel and call your doctor if you see unexpected signs of early puberty in a child, or signs in a woman, which may include changes in body hair or a large increase in acne, possibly due to accidental exposure. men with breast cancer or who have or might have prostate cancer, and women who are or may become pregnant or are breastfeeding, should not use androgel.
part. lyndon johnson did, bill clinton did. he doesn't. >> so even though the kids are going to be out of the house, so to speak, you don't expect him to change? >> i think it would being a great. designee just made a joke the kids are moving out, come on over. >> it's >>> the cars of tomorrow, they're on display today at the detroit auto show. we'll show you the cars and the truck that give you the best bang for your buck. >>> and take look at the groundbreaking new corvette stingray. all right. pretty. you're watching "cbs this morning." t he do it with >> announcer: this morning's eye opener at 8:00 is brought to you by sponsor with an inside story on shingles. democrats? e >>> planning for your retirement is more important than ever, so why are more people raiding their 401(k)s to pay their bills? "moneywatch" jill schlesinger is back and she'll show you why it's so important to save and why it's so important to never touch your 401(k). >>> a little later? >>> i'm charlie d'agata in london and i'll tell you why the great british butler is making a g
president bill clinton surprised everyone when he came out to salute "lincoln," and in the end they laughed, they cried, and, of course, the party continues. >> good night. >> so the golden globe was a night full of surprises, and no bigger surprise than one that the audience didn't actually see. this happened back stage in the press room after "django unchained" quinton terrantino won. the movie has come under scrutiny for the liberal use of the n-word. quinton was candid in his response why he uses it so much. listen. >> if somebody is out there actually saying it when it comes to the word [ bleep ], that the fact that i was using it in the movie more than it was used back in the antebellum south in 1858, well, then they might have -- then feel free to make that case, but no one is actually making that case. so, in other words, what they're actually saying is i should soften it. they are saying i should lie. they are saying i should white wash and massage, and i never do that when it comes to my characters. >> please, [ bleep ], no questions. all right. black people questions are all righ
. and despite her recents health scare, bill clinton says hillary is doing great. he made a bold prediction about theo outgoing secretary of stat. >> she's always been very, very healthy and she has very low blood pressure. i tell her that she's still got time to have three more husbands after me. so i think she'll live to be 120. >> hillary clinton as you know is recovering from a blood clot in her head. >>> in englewood, california, a woman -- a man, rather, has experienced his own version of reality tv. he was watching a high speed chase on television when all of a sudden the car with the cops in hot pursuit passed right in front of him. police eventually arrested the driver. said he was only a boy although they declined to re veal his age. >>> so believe it or not, this picture you'll see tells only half the story. coming up, the bizarre train wreck caused by a cleaning lady. >>> plus extreme eating. every time you go some of the most popular restaurants in the country, and we're not talking about drive-through. we're counting calories, you will be shocked next. abetes... your doctor wi
traditional progressive approach. as for your first question, absolutely, john. hillary clinton would, in fact, keep papering over this issue, although i do think there would at least be some kind of a bill bradley-style challenge. in 2000 al gore faced a challenge from bill bradley on his left. it wouldn't be as robust as bradley was in 2000, i don't think -- and that wasn't terribly robust in 2000, but i think there would be some nominal challenge from her left that would say, you know, democrats can't go back to sort of clinton-style politics. now, given her popularity, as you mentioned, john, across demographic and across ideological lines, i think it would be fairly minimal. there would be some kind of challenge there, i believe. >> gene, jonathan just mentioned sherrod brown's sense that, you know, they weren't going to go near entitlements because entitlements, that's who the democratic party is. that's who they are. entitlements are now 20% think of federal spending. how do the democrats, the republicans, how does this country survive economically without addressing entitlements? and b
to be lofty, inspirational and unifying, if anything? >> you know, i was reading bill clinton's second inaugural where he talks about, you know, the status quo nature of government which we see today as well, that americans a americans are to turn this division the government the way it is. the petty bickering they did for big things. i think the president wants to try to talk about where he feels he can have the most impact in his second term domestically and internationally which is a huge piece, by the way. because i think his first term internationally was about coming home, was about sort of pulling america back from its projection of power. there are so many both real problems and crises but also opportunities for the president. so i think that the speech is really about where he wants to have the most impact. and i think that's how he'll be judged, and that's where people will really take notice of what he says. >> david, before you tell us who's on "meet the press" this sunday, back to the speech for just a moment. do you think there's any chance at all that the president will
inaugural speeches from the last 60 years starting with ronald reagan, bill clinton from 1993, dwilingt eisenhower from 1957, harry truman from 1949, then john f. kennedy in 1961. george h.w. bush, jimmy carter and we'll wrap up the night with george w. bush's speech. see ten inaugural speeches from ten past presidents on c-span. >> up next senate his torn don richy gave a historical perspective on inaugurations describing how various treated the day and how so help me god became part of the ceremony. this is about an hour. >> now there is a phrase that journalists use a lot. it's called a go to guy. and i think you know what that means. it means somebody who knows a lot about something that the journalists can go to and get from that person reliable information. and there are not that many go to guys around. there are a lot of people in this town who have opinions. there are a lot of people in this town who are incredibly glib. but there are not that many people who are so fundamentally immersed in a subject. and an important subject that journalists and others, ack demics are attracte
will introduce early next week. in in this bill, we will nullify anything that the president does that smacks of legislation. several executive orders that appear as if he's writing law. that cannot happen. we struck down once -- the court struck down clinton for trying this, and i'm afraid president obama may have this king complex. >> what do you make of what he's saying? 23 executive actions, some you think would be targets for being struck down by a court? >>> there's the completely anti government wing that will make that argument. i guess they made it against president bush 41 when he banned the importation of certain kind of assault weapons and made it against executive order signed by president clinton. presidents have the power to do executive orders. that's a power deferred to the president by congress and the constitution. there are those -- as rand paul says, he wants to nullify. that's code word. >> for what? >> nullification, look when it's been used. it's kind of a state's rights argument that gets used in times of great controversy. but the president is acting by executive pow
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)